Editorial: #SaveStudentNewsrooms

“Vol. 1, No. 1! … Our Alma Mater has never had a regular periodical, but that is no reason why she should not have one,” wrote an enterprising group of young men at a small college on the east end of Allentown. “We enter upon with the firm conviction that a publication of this description will supply a long-felt want, and that it can be of perpetual benefit to our college.”

Of course, the ‘alma mater’ in question in the above 1883 article is Muhlenberg and the publication none other than The Muhlenberg Weekly (at that point in time it was officially known as the “Muhlenberg Monthly”). There have certainly been many changes since 1883 — including a relocation to the present-day home in Allentown’s west end, 11 presidents, and the introduction of co-education — but one constant remains: The Muhlenberg Weekly.

Read the rest of The Muhlenberg Weekly’s editorial here

Editorial: Student Journalism Matters: The Villanovan Calls for Support

I had clocked in to the office at around five that evening, and then proceeded to spend roughly seven hours trying to figure out how to lay out my section and determine next week’s round of articles with my co-editor. I also had to learn the names of twelve new faces who, for the most part, were all older than me and all seemed to know what they were doing. There were style guidelines and grammar guidelines and editing processes that I just could not get the hang of. Piled on top of this was the certainty running through my mind that someone was going to figure out that I didn’t belong there, that I was not the right person for the job.

Read the rest of The Villanovan’s editorial here

Editorial: Independent journalism holds power accountable. And it starts in student newsrooms.

The Daily Campus, the student newspaper for Southern Methodist University, recently announced it is re-affiliating with the university after the financial burden of independence has become unmanageable. In response, student editors at The Independent Florida Alligator are spearheading a movement to call attention to the challenges student newsrooms face in producing quality content with limited resources.

The Daily Free Press itself has historically struggled to keep its head above water. In the fall of 2014, with debt amounting to $70,000, the FreeP switched from printing daily to printing weekly. That November, we announced that unless we could raise money to pay back a large portion of our debt, we would be forced to stop printing entirely. Donations amounting over $70,000 from high-profile donors, including Bill O’Reilly, saved our weekly print edition.

Read the rest of The Daily Free Press’ editorial here

Editorial: This is why we want The State Press to matter to you

The State Press has been covering ASU in some capacity for almost 130 years, since before Tempe Normal School was a university or Arizona was a state.

We’ve operated as an insert in The East Valley Tribune, a publication of the ASU journalism school and, since the ’70s, as an editorially independent, student-run newsroom beneath the umbrella of ASU Student Media.

We work to serve, challenge and provoke the University community we serve. And with more than 100,000 enrolled, it’s a big community to cover.

Read the rest of The State Press’ editorial here

Editorial: The Amsterdammer to Join the #SaveStudentNewsrooms Initiative

Today, April 25, alongside 120 student newsrooms, The Amsterdammer will proudly join the international student movement #SaveStudentNewsroom on the –unofficial– Support Student Journalism Day. This movement is an initiative created by the editorial board of the Independent Florida Alligator, a student newspaper that serves the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida.

The Amsterdammer is a recently-created student newspaper, an ode to our belief that student-run news organisations are crucial tools for journalism education. Earlier this week, our founder Isabel Bonnet explained why student journalism is a necessity. To explain why such a new paper is already affected by lack of funding, it is first important to understand our standpoint.

Read the rest of The Amsterdammer’s editorial here

Editorial: State of the Paper: It’s time for everyone to do their part to save student newsrooms

Over the past few years, the Free Press has regularly struggled to make ends meet. It’s been easy to think that it’s just us, that we must be doing something wrong, that it’s just because students won’t rally around saving their student paper at a commuter campus.

But it isn’t just the Free Press. Far from it.

Read the rest of The Scarlet and Gray’s editorial here

Editorial: College Newspapers Are Dying, Let’s Save Them

Today, we’re having a conversation about journalism — a craft, a career path, an industry that is currently hemorrhaging before our eyes and at our mercy. Changes in the way media is disseminated, digested and financed are affecting newsrooms across the country, and despite a lack of attention thus far, college newsrooms are not exempt from these widespread threats.

Read the Washington Square News’ editorial here

Editorial: You need us, student media’s vital role in the life of a university

“Don’t get in the professionals’ way.”

That was a statement said to Cory Hancock, then-photo editor for The Sentinel, by a press manager for the Trump-Pence campaign in September 2016 right before a press conference with Newt Gingrich.

Hancock and then-staff-writer Madeline McGee did not get in the professionals’ way, and, in fact, took the feature photo for the story and participated in questioning the former speaker of the house just as everyone else did.

Read the rest of The Sentinel’s editorial here 

Editorial: Help us roar. How you can #SaveStudentNewsrooms

Imagine, just for a moment, what life would be like if The Tiger no longer existed. Who would you turn to for information when a CATbus catches fire? Who would call out CUSG when it does something shady? What would you use for last minute wrapping paper when there are no newspapers to be found?

Unfortunately, that future isn’t far off.

The Tiger, like many student-run newsrooms across the country, is struggling financially. And no one’s been talking about it — until now.

Read the rest of The Tiger’s editorial here

Editorial: Recent changes at The Collegian serve as proof we care about our future

You may remember our previous pieces, in which we laid everything out on our financial situation and where we asked students to take ownership of their newspaper. As we inch closer to the end of the spring semester, the staff has taken steps to alter our product delivery to prove that we care about our future.

As the financial future of this publication is discussed by experts in the media, communications and journalism department, we hope the changes we’ve begun to implement produce results that will help The Collegian thrive if they are continued beyond the spring semester. We have reported previously that within a few months, we are set to enter a financial red zone.

Read the rest of The Collegian’s editorial here