From Connor Spielmaker: Why you should care about #SaveStudentNewsrooms

Name: Connor Spielmaker

College publications:  UNF Spinnaker (Jacksonville, Florida)

Where I am now:  Content Producer at CNN

Student journalism, or journalism as I like to call it, is the single most-important student-operated entity on a campus. Of course, this is easily true for a communications or journalism student, since it gives them on-the-job experience in a real-stakes environment. All my friends that I know from college just wouldn’t be where they are today without student journalism. But that’s easy, right? Of course student media is important for kids that want to be journalists. But why should a random education major, or engineering major, or faculty member, or staff member, or parent care about journalism coming from their campus?

Because it’s their community. And nobody else is going to cover it like the people living, working and learning it every day.

In being asked to write this editorial, I thought back to some of the bigger moments while I was involved in Spinnaker, and how some of the biggest stories to come from campus simply wouldn’t have broke without the Spinnaker.

Take the 2013 change-in-stance on UNF adding a football team. Early in the Fall 2012 semester, a Spinnaker journalist interviewed Athletic Director Lee Moon about UNF adding a football team.

It was essentially a firm no. Over Christmas break, a different Spinnaker journalist covering an Osprey’s away game (you read that right, during Christmas break) happened to be sitting near Moon when he was asking some pretty interesting questions about a college football program for someone who wasn’t thinking about it. The journalist was able to combine those notes with other notes from Spinnaker journalists involved in other areas of campus and boom – confirmed, there was a conversation happening about bringing football to UNF. That story took the campus, and Jacksonville, by storm. All from Spinnaker journalists.

Sports not your thing? How about public corruption? In the summer of 2013, thousands of Spinnaker newspapers were taken from campus racks and dumped – an effort to prevent the community from reading something in it. At face value, nobody cared. The papers were “free” (not really but that’s a separate editorial). The police weren’t helping, the State’s Attorney didn’t care, and someone was going to get away with it. But then a break – sources familiar with a few Spinnaker journalists that covered the campus crime beat got in touch and said the PD knows a bit more than they’re letting on. After a few more conversations and some bread crumbs, a Spinnaker journalist was able to connect the dots and broke the news – A Florida State Trooper was the one who had taken the papers, and he did it in an effort to prevent people from reading about a friend of his that had been arrested on campus for recording people in the bathroom.

This story was picked up by every Jacksonville media outlet, many other outlets around the country, and even the world.

These are just two examples. The vast majority of stories that were picked up by the rest of the world were reported after the Spinnaker broke the story. Stories that likely wouldn’t have been told if not for a Spinnaker journalist.

Beyond big stories with big headlines like that though were the day-to-day stories of life in the UNF community. Teachers getting awards, sports teams winning or losing, features on other members of the community, big names coming to campus, keeping an eye on how the campus’ money was spent, doing justice by those who were lost to tragedy, and offering comfort to their memory.

So yeah, sure, had I not been a ‘student journalist’ I wouldn’t be who I am or where I am today. And that’s important to me of course. But that’s not what is really important. What should matter to you is that without those ‘student journalists,’ things might be different. Your campus’ successes may go untold. Your community might miss out on something great. Your story may not be told.

Support journalism. Support journalists. Support community.

From TyLisa C. Johnson: At my student publications, we made something out of virtually nothing

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Name: TyLisa C. Johnson

College publications:  The Famuan, Journey magazine (Tallahassee, Florida)

Where I am now:  Incoming Lenfest Fellow, Reporter at the Philadelphia Inquirer

When I became editor-in-chief of Florida A&M University’s Journey magazine, we had the tiniest budget in recent memory; about $1200 a semester. It was a moment that left me grappling with an industry-wide question: How do I make more with less?
Two years later, by way of creativity and finesse, I had overseen the publishing of six magazines — most printed, some exclusively digital. So early in my career, I learned about the issues plaguing the journalism field, but also of the field’s importance. Time and time again, my staff and I made something out of (virtually) nothing and then took that something and made it award-winning. I gained my deepest friendships and most cherished memories working until 4 a.m. in the magazine office to make deadlines, or reporting on a three-hour Board of Trustees meeting for our student newspaper, The Famuan. Reporting for The Famuan taught me bravery, compassion and the importance of having someone to hold the “higher powers that be” accountable. It was truly a highlight of my college career. The nights spent on my makeshift bed (office couch) are what eventually led to bigger journalistic opportunities for me, a black, female reporter. Outside of what wonderful things these newsrooms do for students, everyone should support student newsrooms, because those newsrooms help shape our country’s future. Those newsrooms are the foundation for people who will go on to write the news stories of tomorrow, potentially changing the culture or the country with their words. So please, support student newsrooms and continue to encourage young journalists to be the brave journalists our country needs.

From Ben Conarck: The Vermont Cynic ‘reaffirmed my commitment to the profession’

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Name: Ben Conarck

College publication: The Vermont Cynic ( Burlington, Vermont)

Where I am now: Investigative Reporter at The Florida Times-Union

As an undergrad, I went to a school without a formal journalism program (the University of Vermont). In my sophomore year, I decided I needed an extracurricular activity and, due to my interest in journalism, decided to start volunteering for the student-run newspaper: The Vermont Cynic. I learned some of the basics of the craft and began reporting. Within a semester, I was editing other students. I would have never entertained the idea of a career in journalism without the ability to try it out myself in a low-stakes, low-risk environment. This reaffirmed my commitment to the profession and helped inform my career decisions post-graduation.

From Carolyn Roque: Journalism and the truth matter so much right now.

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Name: Carolyn Roque

Where I am now: FSView & Florida Flambeau/Staff Writer (Tallahassee, Florida)

My interest in journalism began in high school after I took a journalism class and then went on to join the yearbook staff for the next 3 years. Yearbook was a huge part of my life and I learned things that helped me in college at every level. The work and friendships I made shaped who I am, and those memories are still clear as day in my head (like watching Shattered Glass to learn about ethics, and learning to write movie reviews after watching Ferris Bueller’s Day Off).

When I began college, I pretty much stepped away from journalism and went on to study creative writing. As a junior in college, I’ve found my way back to journalism and it feels like home (cue dramatic music).

I am thankful to the FSView for giving me the opportunity to be a part of their wonderful team. I am proud to write for this award-winning paper that so many put so much time and effort into every week and every day.

Without student newsrooms, I don’t know how prepared I would be for this career that I hope to pursue. Without student newsrooms, I wouldn’t of met the pretty incredible people that I know today. Without student newsrooms, I would have nowhere to place the curiosity and restlessness that us journalists live with.

Journalism and truth matters so much right now. We need to keep student newsrooms alive because these students are the ones that will go on to become the journalists that uncover truths that need to be told, or tell stories of those who don’t have a voice, or even bring people to justice. I’m talking like the staff of The Washington Post, uncovering years of Roy Moore’s sexual harassment history. The New York Times covering the Russian interference in the 2016 election. Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey’s coverage of Hollywood’s sexual predators. & So. Much. More.

Journalism matters and it all starts in student newsrooms. Pick up a paper, follow some socials, and support, support, support. #SaveStudentNewsrooms

From Adam Lichtenstein: I wouldn’t be who I am today without The Alligator

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Name: Adam Lichtenstein

College publication: The Independent Florida Alligator (Gainesville, Florida)

Where I am now: Sports Reporter at Palm Beach Post

I didn’t get to college dreaming of being a journalist. I wanted to work for a sports team in some capacity. I had worked on my high school newspaper, mostly to bolster my college resume. But after half a semester at the University of Florida, I realized I missed writing and that I really didn’t have a career path in sports. So I figured I’d give journalism a shot.

After a couple semesters in the journalism program, I basically idolized The Alligator. The writers, particularly in the sports section, were insightful, witty and, most of all, really good. After a few tries, I was hired onto the staff. I spent my last two years of college working for the paper, and they were an amazing two years. I wouldn’t be the person I am today, and I certainly wouldn’t be the journalist I am, without The Alligator.

From Colleen Wright: ‘There’s nothing like producing professional work with your best friends’

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Name: Colleen Wright

College publication: The Independent Florida Alligator (Gainesville, Florida)

Where I am now: Education Reporter at the Miami Herald

I credit my time at the Independent Florida Alligator as not only a springboard to four internships and a job offer in college, but also as the cornerstone of my entire college experience. I grew as a journalist and as a person in my three years at the Alligator. In addition to providing real-world opportunities at the student level, it gave me a social scene and a support group. I’ve made friends for life at the paper. There’s nothing like producing professional work with your best friends five nights a week. Student newspapers are the real college journalism learning experience, ones that employers look to for real-world and leadership skills. They are the biggest asset to budding journalists everywhere. #savestudentnewspapers!

From Katelyn Newberg: ‘Student journalism is hard but we do it because we’re passionate.’

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Name: Katelyn Newberg

College newspaper: The Independent Florida Alligator (Gainesville, Florida)

Where I am now: Incoming intern at the Las Vegas Review-Journal (Las Vegas, Nevada)

When you tell others about your experiences at a student publication, you don’t normally talk about the bad stuff.
You say that it was the best four semesters of your life. You gush over the life-long friends you met and the important stories you were honored to write down. You laugh when remembering the late-night coffee runs and scrambling to make deadlines.
But in all honesty? Student journalism is incredibly hard. It’s not fun to try and balance homework, studying, exams, keeping up relationships and just maintaining your life when you spend all your time working for a student paper. You probably don’t get paid well. You’re lucky if you get paid at all.
So why do we do it? For me, I spent four years at the Independent Florida Alligator because it ignited a passion for journalism that no class assignment could. I barely knew anything about journalism when I stumbled upon the paper in a dilapidated fraternity house in Gainesville, Florida. But over the next three years I would go on to serve as a staff writer, university editor and, finally, editor-in-chief.
Student journalism gave me the chance to tell stories I never dreamed I would be able to. I’ve talked to survivors of sexual assault, a U.S. senator, an Olympic ice skater and protesters in Washington, D.C. I’ve seen everything from student government scandals to a white supremacist on our campus, and I’m incredibly thankful for the chance to cover all of it.
More on that white supremacists: I have never seen a group of college students working so hard on a common goal than when Richard Spencer came to UF. We were there with the national newspapers and the professional journalists from across Florida. We chased after groups of protesters, never knowing if the situation was going to get dangerous. We made a paper that I was incredibly proud of and covered the story from the perspective of our audience, the students at UF. That’s what student journalism can do.
So student journalism is hard but we do it because we’re passionate. Unfortunately, passion doesn’t always cut it. As editor in chief in Fall 2017, I oversaw the paper from printing five days a week to three days a week for the first time. My staff had pay cuts to their already bleak paychecks. I was afraid that if I really screwed up, the paper would suffer even more. Maybe we wouldn’t be able to print at all.
Student journalists need help, and sometimes we have to admit we can’t save ourselves. So next time you see an article online that looks interesting, give it a read. Pick up a copy of the paper on your way to class. Get a subscription if one is available. Donate to your local student publication if you’re able to. We’re the future of journalism and while we’re not going anywhere, we really could use your help.
Looking back on my time at the Alligator, I wouldn’t be the person I am today without it. I probably wouldn’t have an internship when I graduate in less than two weeks without it. All I can hope is that when the next nervous sophomore walks into the paper’s office, they will have the chance to learn and grow as much as I did.